Scandinavia comprises the three culturally, linguistically, and historically related nations of Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. Together with Finland and Iceland – as well as the territories of Greenland, the Faeroe Islands, and Åland – they form the broader region known as the Nordic countries. RealScandinavia.com focuses on the three Scandinavian countries but includes occasional news and dispatches related to the greater Nordic area.

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Latest Articles

Magical Light and Shifting Sands: Skagen and Its Artists

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At the far northern tip of Denmark is a narrow finger of land jutting into the waters of Kattegat and Skagerrak, the two great straits that join the Baltic and North Seas. This is the Skagen Peninsula, a land carved by wind and waves, whose constantly shifting sand dunes have shaped both the landscape and the human life here – so much so that the town’s 14th-century church had to be abandoned in 1795 after it became increasingly difficult for the congregation to dig through the sand to attend services.


Elks and Beavers and Bears, Oh My! Swedish Safari Tourism on the Rise

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Wildlife-loving travelers dream of going on safari Kenya, Tanzania, South Africa, Botswana…and Sweden? Yes, that’s right, Sweden. It may not have the elephants, lions, and giraffes, but if you forego the African animals in favor of Nordic species such as bear, elk, beaver, and seal, you’ll find that Sweden has a great deal to offer in the way of wildlife tourism.


Midsummer in Sweden: Origins and Traditions

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Given Scandinavia’s long, dark winters, it’s not surprising that the arrival of summer is a big deal throughout the Nordic countries. In Sweden, Midsummer’s Eve is one of the most important days of the year, rivaling Christmas with its festive spirit and traditions.


Syttende Mai: The Most Norwegian Day of the Year

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Syttende Mai (May 17) is Norway’s national holiday, the day the Norwegian Constitution was signed at Eidsvoll in 1814, declaring Norway to be an independent nation after more than 400 years under Danish rule. However, a brief war between Norway and Sweden in the following months led to a loose union between the two countries, with Sweden the dominant partner. Full Norwegian independence did not come until the dissolution of the union in 1905, but it is still May 17 that is celebrated as the country’s official national day.


From Medieval Monks to Henning Mankell: Exploring Ystad’s History and Mystery

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Located on Sweden’s southern coast, overlooking the Baltic Sea, the small town of Ystad is an idyllic sort of place, with flower-filled cobblestoned streets and half-timbered houses that reflect its medieval origins. It’s not the sort of place you’d associate with murder and mayhem, but thanks to author Henning Mankell’s bestselling series of crime novels about police detective Kurt Wallander, Ystad is now known as much for mystery as it is for history.


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