Commuter rail train. Photo by  Gustav Gullberg/Wikimedia Commons.

Public Transportation in Stockholm: Getting to and around Sweden’s Capital

Stockholm has an excellent public transportation network of commuter trains, subways, and buses, making it easy to get around the city and its suburbs. For trips on the city’s abundant waterways, there are passenger ferries and excursion boats into the archipelago on the Baltic Sea side and into Lake Mälaren. The city also has extensive rail, bus, and air links to destinations throughout Sweden and beyond.

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From Copenhagen to Oslo (or Vice Versa) by Sea

One of the easiest and most comfortable ways to travel between Copenhagen and Oslo is to go by overnight cruise-ferry. DFDS Seaways operates two ships, the Pearl and the Crown, that depart at 4:30 p.m. daily from each city, arriving in the other at approximately 9:45 the following morning.

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Crossing the Heart of Sweden on a Göta Canal Cruise

For a leisurely, scenic way to experience central Sweden, a cruise on the Göta Canal is not to be missed. Stretching for 190.5 kilometers (just over 118 miles), the canal route passes through 58 locks and numerous lakes between Mem near Söderköping and Södertorp on Lake Vänern, the largest lake in Sweden.

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Stockholm Central Station, T-Centralen, and Cityterminalen

Sweden’s largest railway station, Stockholm Central, sits at the western end of Stockholm’s downtown shopping district, with its main entrance on Vasagatan. From here, trains depart for major cities and towns throughout Sweden. The Arlanda Express train leaves Stockholms Central four to six times an hour and takes just 20 minutes to the airport.

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From Mountains to Fjord on the Flåm Railway

One of Norway’s iconic train experiences, the Flåm Railway covers a distance of just 20.2 kilometers (12.5 miles) but changes 863.meters (2833 feet) in altitude, making for a dramatic ride. One of the steepest normal-gauge railways in the world, the route runs between the small highland station of Myrdal on the Oslo-Bergen line and the village of Flåm on the shores of the Aurlandsfjord, an arm of the world’s longest fjord, the Sognefjord.